Blog Archives

I Believe

Of course there is a magical being in the sky who gives us life.  Not something you’ll hear often from an atheist.

But we figured it out tens of thousands of years ago.  At some point, human beings developed enough intelligence to notice that something in the sky gave us life.  They could even see it.  A yellow circle.

When it was around, it gave warmth and light.  Two things essential to survival (yes, light included, because we depend on eyesight to find food and avoid predators).

But it wasn’t always there.  Sometimes it would be obscured by clouds, and cold rain would fall from the sky.  Humans were worried on those days.  Perhaps they were superstitious, thinking they had done something to upset the magical yellow circle in the sky.

They would have loved to have known more about it, but they didn’t have a way to learn.  So they prayed to it to always be there for them, and even sacrificed to it.  They argued over which acts angered the circle, and in groups decided what not to do, for of course, the circle was always watching them from the sky.

For ages these practices continued.  Many peoples started worshiping other natural elements, like rain for crops, and wind for calm seas.  They had no idea why these things happened.  They were like magic, and if prayer made a difference, even for peace of mind, what was the harm in that?

Eventually, humans did figure out how to learn about these “magics”.  We learned that the sun is a ball of fire, it comes and goes by the rotation of the earth, and about its effects of heat and light and even vitamin D.  We learned what causes wind, about the water cycle that causes rain, why we have seasons, what makes certain plants grow, and many more things.  These discoveries fall under the umbrella of “science”.

But by then, worship of the circle in the sky and other natural beings had taken other forms, as mythology evolved.  Mystical forces were called “gods”. Some were anthropomorphized; others had the forms of animals.  Great stories were written about these deities, and groups argued and fought with others who believed in different gods, just like how people would have argued over how to please (and not to anger) the all-powerful sun for giving us life, which is itself related to different systems of morals and ethics and lists of what thou shalt not do. Peoples’ superstitions remained with us, and though sacrifice is uncommon, prayer is a daily part of life for many people.

I believe this is how religion developed.

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Movie Previews

I saw Alice in Wonderland recently, and when the first preview was an obvious kids movie, I wondered, will they play kids/family movie trailers first, and then go from there into movies that will have less appeal for kids? I thought this would be smart, because then if kids decide to play the nagging game: “That looks so cool! Can we see it? I wanna see it! Mommmmyyyy!!”, by the time the movie itself starts, they’ll either have been shushed into being quiet, or at their vocal chords would completely give out. And everyone could enjoy the movie.

But they ruined it for me by playing ALL previews for kids/family movies. Seriously, a Toy Story 3? That’s weak.

Facebook Shouldn’t Have A Dislike Button

For at least a few months now, people on Facebook have been clamouring for a “Dislike” button to match the “Like” feature that’s been rather popular among users. I think this idea is stupid.

Reason #1: It’s been done. Reddit, Digg, and other social bookmarking sites, and probably many more such things, have points assigned to posts. I’m talking posts of all kinds: links, photos, notes, just like in facebook (and this website, even). The points are given by users, who vote up or down. The most popular posts rise to the top of the lists and get more views. It works well in filtering out less interesting and less funny material, and helps a browser (you know, a person who browses) find the best stuff quickly.

But on Facebook, the only posts you see are from friends and pages/groups that you choose to add. And sometimes also 500 other people who you met once but just had to add to Facebook so you can stalk them or appear more popular (omigod you have 879 friends well actually i have 933 i guess i’m just cool like that). But anyway: the whole concept of Facebook is to connect to things you already like. It’s its OWN quality filter. And you probably know what friends are more likely to post stuff you’re interested in.

Reason #2: Online bullying. When they stopped only accepting university and college students on the site, high school students flocked to it like pararazzi to Britney Spears. Just think of the ways to be cruel with this button. Think of your recent status updates or posts, and imagine your feelings if you received even one “dislike”.

And high school students can be mean as fuck. So can adults, of course, but we’re less likely to click “dislike” on everything the unpopular kid does. I can even picture innocuous “dislike”s creating firestorms of rage and broken friendships, due to simple misunderstandings. Yes, I’m being extreme, but a dislike button would have the potential to devastate. And yes, there is already the option to comment, negatively, but the dislike button is a quick-and-easy weapon that requires no thought. That is yet another part of its power.

The dislike button is sought-after in part for quick-and-easy responses to posts like “Ross has to work until 8pm tonight :(” or other things that merit sympathy. But the disadvantages of implementing this feature far outweigh any benefit. Facebook, if you’re reading this, I am available to work in your development department. From home.

Not In My Bed

I thought of who, if the situation came up where it might be considered, I would allow to have sex in my bed. To be clear, I mean that I would not be there. This isn’t something that I would want, but it would be like a good favour to a friend, under whatever circumstances would merit such an idea.

It quickly occurred to me that I would be willing to let only my best male friends use my bed. A total of maybe, maybe, 5 guys. I wouldn’t if I thought the female party was dirty or crazy, I guess, but whatever. It’s interesting that I wouldn’t really be cool with any of my female friends using my bed. Not because I like them or think I have some sort of claim to them. It’s probably an evolutionary instinct thing, to not let strange dudes mate where you mate. It makes sense, because it would probably weaken your animal status, almost like a power thing against other guys.

It’s weird though, that I know my best female friend’s boyfriend well, and still would be uncomfortable with that situation. I wonder what the true basic primal instincts are that control this behaviour and thought. It would be interesting to know how, exactly, this works.

If you know the answers, I’d like to know.